Betta Fish Water Parameters

Betta fish may not be the most demanding of tropical aquarium fish, but they still have their preferences. Betta fish water parameters aren’t as difficult to get right as they are with other tropical fish. Having said that, many people are killing their betta fish or leaving it dying slowly in poor water. Here’s how to keep your betta fish alive with the correct water parameters. This article looks at the correct temperature, Ph and water hardness for your betta as well as giving information on how these requirements can be altered if necessary.

 

 

Betta fish may not be the most demanding of tropical aquarium fish, but they still have their preferences. Betta fish water parameters aren’t as difficult to get right as they are with other tropical fish. Having said that, many people are killing their betta fish or leaving it dying slowly in poor water. Here’s how to keep your betta fish alive with the correct water parameters. This article looks at the correct temperature, Ph and water hardness for your betta as well as giving information on how these requirements can be altered if necessary.

PH

The Ph is a measure of how acidic or alkaline your water is. Typically, tap water is slightly alkaline, meaning it has a Ph above the neutral point which is 7. This is a perfectly acceptable Ph for your betta fish, which can tolerate water between 6.5 and 7.5 Ph. If you are uncertain about the Ph of your tap water, your water supplier will be able to tell you this as well as other queries you may have about its mineral content.

There are products that claim they can achieve a specific Ph and these may have varying levels of success. The best way to keep the Ph of the water in your betta tank stable is to measure it regularly using Ph paper or testing strips. Ph is raised by metals present in the water which also contribute to your water hardness, which is explained below.

You can lower Ph by either adding acid, or filtering out some of these metals. You can also add bogwood or peat to your betta fish aquarium to lower the Ph. Alder cones are especially effective and natural. These methods are much better than artificially changing the Ph. Reverse Osmosis water has a very low Ph and can be mixed with tap water to give the desired Ph. R.O. Water is available in many pet shops.

 

Water Hardness

Water hardness is one of the more complicated aspects of betta water requirements to explain. In essence, water hardness refers to how many particles there are present in the water of your betta tank that aren’t water particles. Magnesium and iron are examples of this. If you experience a lot of lime scale in your kettle at home or in the office then it is likely that you have hard water.

Water hardness can be slightly lowered by boiling the water to remove temporary hardness, although unless your water is very hard, you should be within the 5 to 20° dH range that betta fish can live happily in. Water hardness can be tested using simple paper testing strips or at your local pet shop.

Hardness can be lowered by filtering your water over peat moss before adding it to your tank, using processes such as distillation or reverse osmosis or even by using rainwater. Most of these measures should by quite unnecessary unless your water is exceptionally hard.

 

Temperature

The temperature of your betta fish water will influence its metabolism, inclination towards growth and breeding and its immune system. You should try to keep your betta tank between 70 and 85F. Unless your home or office is either very hot or very cold, this shouldn’t be of concern and you should be able to maintain your betta fish aquarium temperature quite easily. Should you need to purchase a heater, make sure it is suitable for your aquarium size and ideally thermostat controlled.

 

Betta fish water Sources

The easiest place to get water for your betta fish Aquarium is straight from the tap. If you are planning to use tap water, you must make sure you use a dechlorinator product before pouring it into your tank. Just leaving the water for the chlorine to evaporate is not sufficient as many water companies now use chloramines instead. Providing your tap water satisfies the water parameters set out above, then tap water will pose no problems to your betta fish.

Rainwater is a lower Ph source of water and can be mixed with tap water to reach a fairly neutral Ph level. Do not use tap water that has run off a roof as the limestone in the cement will alter its chemical composition. Some rain can be harmful to aquarium fish if it has a high concentration of pollutants, so this option isn’t without its risks.

If your tap water really isn’t suitable for betta fish, the you can buy R.O. Water from your local pet store and mix it with tap water until the desired parameters are met. Try to avoid products that raise or lower the Ph as these are both expensive and unnecessary.